Caldera-related lava flows and intrusions of the south-central San Juan Mountains, Colorado

analytical data
  • 19 Pages
  • 1.84 MB
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  • English

U.S. Geological Survey, Books and Open-File Reports Section [distributor] , Denver, Colo
Calderas -- San Juan Mountains (Colo. and N.M.)., Volcanic ash, tuff, etc. -- San Juan Mountains (Colo. and N.M.)., Intrusions (Geology) -- San Juan Mountains (Colo. and
Statementby Douglas B. Yager, Peter W. Lipman and David A. Sawyer.
SeriesOpen-file report -- 91-313, U.S. Geological Survey open-file report -- 91-313..
ContributionsLipman, Peter W., Sawyer, David A., Geological Survey (U.S.)
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination19 leaves
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17105409M

Caldera-related lava flows and intrusions of the south-central San Juan Mountains, Colorado: Analytical data (Open-file report / United States Department of the Interior, Geological Survey) [Yager, Douglas R] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Caldera-related lava flows and intrusions of the south-central San Juan Mountains, Colorado: /5(2). Caldera-related lava flows and intrusions of the south-central San Juan Mountains, Colorado analytical data (SuDoc I A) [Douglas B.

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Yager] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Buy Caldera-related lava flows and intrusions of the south-central San Juan Mountains, Colorado: Analytical data (Open-file report / United States Department of the Interior, Geological Survey) by Yager, Douglas R (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Douglas R Yager. Get this from a library. Caldera-related lava flows and intrusions of the south-central San Juan Mountains, Colorado: analytical data.

[Douglas B Yager; Peter W Lipman; David A Sawyer; Geological Survey (U.S.)]. Caldera-related lava flows and intrusions of the south-central San Juan Mountains, Colorado Caldera-related lava flows and intrusions of the south-central San Juan Mountains analytical data / by Douglas B.

Yager, Peter W. Lipman and David A. Sawyer U.S. Geological Survey ; Books and Open-File Reports Section [distributor] Denver, Colo. Colorado book Citation. Yager, D., Lipman, P.W., and Sawyer, D.A.,Caldera-related lavas and intrusion of the south-central San Juan Mountains, Colorado--Analytical data: U.S.

The ε Nd values for six large-volume ( km 3) ash-flow tuffs and associated lavas from the multicyclic central caldera cluster of the San Juan volcanic field in south-central Colorado are between those of Proterozoic crust in the region and mantle-derived basaltic magmas, and the values generally become progressively higher in progressively younger tuffs and by: One hundred and two field samples were collected from intrusions throughout the western San Juan Mountains and Summer Coon Volcano over three field seasons from to ().Two suites of intrusions were identified based on optical petrography: generally coarse grained alkaline lamprophyres (Fig.

2A–C) and calc-alkaline basalts to andesites (Fig. 2D–F).Cited by: 8. Reconnaissance geology and economic significance of the Platoro caldera, southeastern San Juan Mountains, Colorado Article (PDF Available) with 56 Reads How we measure 'reads'.

The San Juan volcanic field is part of the San Juan Mountains in southwestern Colorado. It consists mainly of volcanic rocks that form the largest remnant of a major composite volcanic field that covered most of the southern Rocky Mountains in the Middle Tertiary geologic time.

Within the region lie an abundance of caldera volcanoes, which comprise the San Juan Volcanic nates: 37°53′36″N °46′28″W /. Caldera-related lava flows and intrusions of the south-central San Juan Mountains, Colorado; analytical data Open-File Report B. Buy Caldera-related lava flows and intrusions of the south-central San Juan Mountains, Colorado analytical data (SuDoc I A) by Douglas B.

Yager (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible s: 2. Oxygen isotope compositions were measured on quartz, feldspar, and biotite phenocrysts from ash-flow tuffs and lava domes erupted from the Oligocene central Nevada and central San Juan caldera complexes.

Details Caldera-related lava flows and intrusions of the south-central San Juan Mountains, Colorado FB2

Most of the ash-flow tuffs are compositionally zoned with low-phenocryst rhyolite bases and high-phenocryst quartz-latite tops, but both within individual Cited by: CALDERA-RELATED LAVA FLOWS AND INTRUSIONS OF THE SOUTH-CENTRAL SAN JUAN MOUNTAINS, COLORADO-ANALYTICAL DATA ABSTRACT Petrographic, major-oxide, and trace-element data for voluminous Oligocene lava flows and associated intrusions from the southern side of the central San Juan caldera cluster, Colorado, allow subdivision of theseCited by: 2.

Nd- and Pb-isotope variations in the multicyclic central caldera cluster of the San Juan volcanic field, Colorado, and implications for crustal hybridization Full Record Other Related Research.

1. San Juan Volcanic Field - Mapping Study Nested Caldera Study: San Juan and Silverton Caldera Complex Analysis June – Volcanism Focus Johanna Vaughan 2. The focus of this study encompasses the San Juan Volcanic Field (SJVF) analyzing the volcanology, hydrothermal geology, and ore deposit geology of the San Juan Mountains.

The San Juan Mountains are the largest erosional remnant of a composite volcanic field (fig. 1, sheet 3) that covered much of the southern Rocky Mountains in middle Tertiary time (Steven, ).

The San Juan field consists mainly of intermediate-composition lavas and breccias, erupted about 35–30 Ma from scattered cen. SAN JUAN MOUNTAINS • Extraordinary geologic record (PC-Holocene) • Repository of Au, Ag, Zn, Cu, Fe • Outliers of coal, oil, natural gas, U, He, CO.

2 • Geothermal resources • Extensive glacial history • Outstanding scenery. In the central San Juan Mountains, eruption of at least 8, km 3 of dacitic-rhyolitic magma as nine major ash flow sheets (individuallykm 3) was accompanied by recurrent caldera subsidence between Ma and about Ma. Voluminous andesitic-dacitic lavas and breccias erupted from central volcanoes prior to the ash-flow.

The American Alps: the San Juan Mountains of Southwest Colorado / Donald L. Baars; Caldera-related lava flows and intrusions of the south-central San Juan Mountains, Colorado [microform] Geology and mineral deposits of the region surrounding the American Flats Wilderness Study Area, western Pliocene and Quaternary deposits in the.

complex volcanic systems, most notably in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado. This work established the first detailed history of the evolution of the rocks of the San Juan volcanic field and their role in the formation of associated mineral deposits. His finely crafted reports and maps are models of quality research and Size: 1MB.

Description Caldera-related lava flows and intrusions of the south-central San Juan Mountains, Colorado PDF

(en) (avec Douglas R. Yager, David A. Sawyer), Caldera-related lava flows and intrusions of the south-central San Juan Mountains, Colorado, U.S.

Geological Survey, (en) (avec Allen F. Glazner), Mid-tertiary cordilleran magmatism, American Geophysical Union, Caldera-Related Lava Flows and Intrusions of the South-Central San Juan Mountains, Colorado-Analytical Data by Douglas B.

Yager1, Peter W. Lipman^, and David A. Sawyer-* Open-File Report This report is preliminary and has not been reviewed for conformity with U.S. Geological Survey editorial standards and stratigraphic nomenclature. Abstract. Three major cycles of volcanism during the Miocene and Pliocene formed a layered succession of calc-alkaline eruptive materials in the western San Juan Mountains nearly miles thick and having a volume greater than 1, cubic by: 3.

It also complements two prior detailed field guides for adjacent parts of the Southern Rocky Mountain volcanic field that remain largely valid 25 years later: one for the ignimbrites and calderas farther south and west in the San Juan Mountains (Lipman, ) and another for calderas and associated intrusions in the Sawatch Range and at Questa.

Mineralization in Silicic Calderas: Questa, New Mexico and the San Juan Mountains, Colorado, Taos, New Mexico to Lake City, Colorado, July J Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Free ebooks since [email protected] LaGarita Caldera, located in San Juan Mountains of southern Colorada 3. Valles Caldera west of Los Alamos, New Mexico These and similar calderas elsewhere around the globe are among the largest volcanic structures on Earth, hence the name "supervolcanoes".

A caldera is a large cauldron-like hollow that forms shortly after the emptying of a magma chamber/reservoir in a volcanic eruption. When large volumes of magma are erupted over a short time, structural support for the rock above the magma chamber is lost.

The ground surface then collapses downward into the emptied or partially emptied magma chamber, leaving a massive. The Cove Fort area has basalt and basaltic-andesite lava flows and cinder cones with K-Ar whole-rock ages of ~ Ma.

What causes this very young volcanism, probably just more B&R extension. We haven't been able to find any age dates on the fresh looking obsidian intrusions around Marysvale. Get this from a library.

Evolution of the Platoro caldera complex and related volcanic rocks, southeastern San Juan Mountains, Colorado: a study of relations between ash-flow eruptions, lava-flow activity, and caldera structure at a mineralized volcanic center.

[Peter W Lipman; Geological Survey (U.S.),]. The Western San Juan Mountains book. Read 2 reviews from the world's largest community for readers.

The San Juan Skyway winds its way up, over, and throu /5.million years ago in the San Juan mountains, pyroclastic flows created calderas. The la Garita caldera. In this area had one of the largest pyroclastic flows on the planet. In the wheeler geologic mountains near kremmling, solidified ash ft.

thick has been discovered.Thicknesses range from a few hundred meters to over 2 km. The thickest ones, such as in the San Juan Mountains (Colorado, USA), accumulated rapidly during individual supereruptions and represent the thickest single-event deposits on the Earth.

As with outflow sheets, they may be monotonous and crystal rich, crystal poor, or variously zoned.